Watercolours' charm stays
Daily Telegraph, February 1963

ALTHOUGH IT IS THE OILS which constitute a breaking of fresh ground in the work of Francoise Taylor, the familiar watercolours (which have changed little over the years) in her exhibition at the Tib Lane Gallery, Manchester, continue to exert their special feminine charm. The exhibition continues until Feb. 23.

There is, for all their occasional excursions into a kind of Baroque exuberance, a firmness of construction about the watercolours which is not so clearly defined in the oils. They are all peculiarly personal visions, not all too well drawn yet capable of beguiling us into accepting such things as an industrial street so shorn of its grimness that it very nearly becomes a festive scene.

They are in fact slight affairs of line supplemented sparingly with colour. It is a different story with the oils. Here is some quite attractive colour and effective masses rather blurred at the edges. White, tawny brown, green and rich blues are the basic colours, played off, in the case of "The Church, Mikonos", against yellow.

Yet they remind me of nothing so much as stage sets, dimly lit, waiting for something to begin. It is very hard indeed to believe in them. The watercolours can make us suspend judgement; the oils cannot.

F.W.F.